Naher Osten
Türkei, Israel, Arabien, Iran, Irak, Afghanistan, Pakistan, u.a.
!
1049
Gewicht: g

BEETS, C. (1982):

Miocene Molluscs from Muara and Pulu Senumpah, Sangkulirang Bay, northern Kutai (East Borneo), 21 S., 1 Abb., 1 Taf., Mit: BEETS, C.: Miocene (Preangerian) molluscs from Kari Orang, northern Kutai, East Borneo. 26 S., 1 Abb., 3 Taf., Mit: BEETS, C.: Preangerian (Miocene) Mollusca from the Lower Sangkulirang Marl Formation, Kari Orang, Kalimantan (East Borneo). 18 S., 1 Taf.,
1054
Gewicht: g

BEETS, C. (1986):

Molluscan fauna from the Lower Gelingseh Beds s. str., Sangkulirang area, Kalimantan Timur (East Borneo). 82 S., 2 Abb., 5 Taf., mit: BEETS, C.: Notes on Buccinulum (Gastropoda, Buccinidae), a reappraisal. 18 S, 2 Taf., mit: BEETS, C.: Neogene Mollusca from the Vogelkop (Birds Head peninsula), West Irian, New Guinea. 34 S., 2 Abb., 4 Taf.,
2991
Gewicht: g

CAPPETTA, H. (1991):

Decouverte de nouvelles faunes de sélaciens (Neoselachii) dans les phosphates maastrichtiens de la mer rouge, Egypte. Mit: SCHMIDT-KITTLER, N. & HEIZMANN, E.P.J.: Prionogale breviceps n.gen. n.sp. - Evidence of an unknowm major clade of Eutherians in the Lower Miocene of East Africa. Mit: SAH, R.B. & KIRCHNER, M. & SCHAUDERNA, H. & SCHLEICH, H.H.: Diatomites and their Fossils from Kathmandu Valley, Central Nepal. Mit: SEYED-ENAMI, K. & SCHAIRER, G. & AGHANABATI, A.A. & FAZL, M.: Ammoniten aus dem Bathon der Gegend von Tabas - Nayband (Zentraliran). Mit: SCHAIRER, G. & SCHLAMPP, V.: Cymoceras (Ammonitina, Ochetoceratina) von Esselberg. Mit: BARTHELT, D. & FEJFAR, O. & PFEIL, F.H. & UNGER, E.: Notizen zu einem Profil der Selachier-Fundstelle Walbertsweiler im Bereich der miozänen Oberen Meeresmolasse Süddeutschlands. 208 S., 36 Abb., 27 Tab., 30 Taf.;
1515
Gewicht: g

COX, L.R. (1960):

The British Cretaceous Pleurotomariidae. 40 S., 1 Abb., 17 Taf., Mit: COX, L.R.: Two new radiolitids (rudist Lamellibranchia) from the Upper Cretaceous of Turkey. 8 S., 1 Abb., 2 Taf.,
1526
Gewicht: g

DEAN, W.T. (1967):

The Correlation and trilobite fauna of the Bedinan Formation (Ordovician) in southeastern Turkey. 43 S., 4 Abb., 10 Taf.,
2193
Gewicht: g

FREELS, D. (1980):

Limnische Ostracoden aus Jungtertiär und Quartär der Türkei. 169 S., 2 Abb., 2 Tab., 18 Taf.,
1422
Gewicht: g

FREUND, R. / RAAB, M. (1969):

Lower Turonian ammonites from Israel. 83 S., 10 Taf.,
919
Gewicht: g

GAZIRI, A.W. (1976):

Jungtertiäre Mastodonten aus Anatolien (Türkei). 143 S., 2 Abb., 2 Tab., 16 Taf.,
Best.-Nr.: 16-3448
Gewicht: g

HOFKER, J. (1968):

Tertiary Foraminifera of Coastal Ecuador. Lower Oligocene and Lower Miocene. 1-59, 9 Abb., 25 Taf.; Mit: HAAS, W.: Trilobiten aus dem Silur und Devon von Bithynien (NW-Türkei). 60-207, 61 Abb., 3 Tab., 12 Taf.,
4387
Gewicht: g

HOFMANN, G., MESCHEDE, M., ZACKE; A. AL KINDI, M. (2016):

Field Guide to the Geology of Northeastern Oman. - 283 pages, 227 figures,


The geology of Oman is spectacular – for the touristic layman and the geologist alike. Exceptionally well exposed rocks offer a fascinating outcrop experience, second to none. The scenery is unique, and often breathtaking. The Samail Ophiolite (former sea floor you can walk on), mountain ranges, of more than 3000 m altitude, and deeply incised canyons with turquoise-coloured perennial streams, contrast with dry but golden sand deserts. Coastal areas with kilometres of white beaches are waiting to be discovered.

This geological guidebook has two parts: The first provides a general introduction to the geology of Oman, and enables the reader to put the variety of geological phenomena and observations into a scientific context. The authors emphasise describing the processes that led to the formation of Oman's rocks and landscapes formed over millennia of Earth history. Following the introductory chapters on archaeology, climate, and vegetation, the geomorphological and geological aspects of Oman are presented.

The second and largest part of the guide consists of meticulous descriptions of 99 excursion points located across the northeast of the country. The challenge in Oman is to decide where not to stop, rather than the other way round. The authors, therefore, have carefully selected the most interesting and important sites.
The excursion points can easily be located by their coordinates, or may also be visited using the detailed roadmaps provided for each single outcrop. A large number of colour illustrations, a geological overview map, an index, and a list of references complete the content of the guide.

As the book is written in a textbook style and presents the geology in a comprehensible way, a broad understanding is facilitated. Therefore, this field guide not only addresses geologists but also amateurs, visitors and travellers exploring the beauty and the significance of Oman geology.
2123
Gewicht: g

KAEVER, M. (1970):

Die alttertiären Großforaminiferen Südost-Afghanistans unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Nuumulitiden - Morphologie, Taxonomie und Biostratigraphie. 400 S., 30 Abb., 19 Taf.,
2191
Gewicht: g

MENZEL, H. / BECKER-PLATEN, J.D. (1981):

Otolithen uas dem Tertiär der Türkei (Känozoikum und Braunkohlen der Türkei, 24). 90 S., 1 Abb., 8 Tab., 8 Taf.,
3899
Gewicht: g
Größeres Bild

POINAR, G.O. & MILKI, R. (2001):

Lebanese Amber: The Oldest Insect Ecosystem in Fossilized Resin. - 96 S., 90 teils farbige Fotos,

One of the earth's oldest natural treasures, Lebanese amber, which contains the earliest known representatives of many insect groups, unlocks the secrets of a little-known world populated by dinosaurs, pterosaurs and cycads. Dating back some 135 million years to the early Cretaceous, the amber was formed in a wet, tropical kauri pine forest long before Earth's continents reached their present positions.

This extensively illustrated book, the first major review of Lebanese amber, covers all aspects of this rare and highly valued resin, including its origin and its role as a commodity in ancient cultures. The authors discuss each plant and animal fossil thus far recovered from the amber, including nematodes, snails, mites, spiders, and insects, and the earliest complete feather. many of the fossils are represented in color and black and white photographs.

Paleotologists, biologists, and evolutionists will appreciate the book's new information, along with its summary of early research and its analysis of how amber fossils can increase our understanding of insect diversification, biogeography, extinction, and survival. With its information on the origins, characteristics, and ancient uses of Lebanese amber and other Near Eastern resins, the book will appeal to readers of natural history and gem collectors as well.

In the hands of Dr. Poinar and Dr. Milki, who have long shared a passion for these little-investigated deposits, Lebanese Amber presents a powerful, exquisitely detailed portrait of an ecosystem that, without them, might have remained lost to us forever.

3899
Gewicht: g
Größeres Bild

POINAR, G.O. & MILKI, R. (2001):

Lebanese Amber: The Oldest Insect Ecosystem in Fossilized Resin. - 96 S., 90 teils farbige Fotos,

One of the earth's oldest natural treasures, Lebanese amber, which contains the earliest known representatives of many insect groups, unlocks the secrets of a little-known world populated by dinosaurs, pterosaurs and cycads. Dating back some 135 million years to the early Cretaceous, the amber was formed in a wet, tropical kauri pine forest long before Earth's continents reached their present positions.

This extensively illustrated book, the first major review of Lebanese amber, covers all aspects of this rare and highly valued resin, including its origin and its role as a commodity in ancient cultures. The authors discuss each plant and animal fossil thus far recovered from the amber, including nematodes, snails, mites, spiders, and insects, and the earliest complete feather. many of the fossils are represented in color and black and white photographs.

Paleotologists, biologists, and evolutionists will appreciate the book's new information, along with its summary of early research and its analysis of how amber fossils can increase our understanding of insect diversification, biogeography, extinction, and survival. With its information on the origins, characteristics, and ancient uses of Lebanese amber and other Near Eastern resins, the book will appeal to readers of natural history and gem collectors as well.

In the hands of Dr. Poinar and Dr. Milki, who have long shared a passion for these little-investigated deposits, Lebanese Amber presents a powerful, exquisitely detailed portrait of an ecosystem that, without them, might have remained lost to us forever.

4163
Gewicht: g

SHERGOLD, J.H. & SDZUY, K. (1984):

Cambrian and early Tremadocian trilobites from Sultan Dag, central Turkey. 51-135, Abb. 1-2, 8 Taf.,
1503
Gewicht: g

SPATH, L.F. (1950):

A new Tithonian Ammonoid fauna from Kurdistan, Northern Iraq. 54 S., 5 Taf.,
2610
Gewicht: g

THEWISSEN, J.G.M. & MADER, S.I. & HUSSAIN, S.T. (1996):

Ambolocetus natans, an Eocene cetacean (Mammalia) from Pakistan. ? S., ? Abb., ? Taf.,